Tag Archives: Motorcycles

Duru, Province Orientale, DR Congo

After we finished our vaccination program in the area around Ndedu, we headed north of Dungu to a town called Duru. We then planned and organised to vaccinate all the villages from Duru south back to Dungu in a single day. The trip was 93km each way but it took us less than 3 hours to get to Duru, which means it’s an amazing road by Congolese standards!

The road from Dungu to Duru, DR Congo

The reason the road is so good is that the Indonesian military is on the ground as part of the United Nations (MONUSCO) mission in the Democratic Republic of Congo. They’re amazingly efficient at building and improving roads, and the quality of their work is really impressive.

Indonesian military bulldozer preparing the Dungu-Duru road

I didn’t take too many photos on this day trip. This is the backside of the large Catholic church in the town of Duru:

Catholic church, Duru, DR Congo

This kid was staring at me when we tried to find the catechist to discuss placing a vaccination site beside the church, so I asked if I could take his photo:

Child carrying bricks, Duru, DR Congo

Within seconds his friends or siblings showed up with their bricks, too, wanting their pictures taken. It’s always fun showing little children photos on a digital camera screen afterwards; they get a real kick out of it.

Children carrying bricks, Duru, DR Congo

On the way back to Dungu one of the places we stopped was this monument to three FARDC soldiers killed by Joseph Kony’s LRA a couple years back:

Monument to three FARDC soldiers killed by the LRA
Monument to three FARDC soldiers killed by the LRA

Anyone looking for a map of the Dungu-Duru road with village names, distances, and motorcycle driving times, just contact me and I’ll send it all your way.

Disclaimer: The postings and views expressed on this site are mine alone, and do not represent the position or values of Médecins Sans Frontières.

Ndedu, Province Orientale, DR Congo

In mid-February, a few of us went south from Dungu to Ndedu by motorcycle to plan, prepare, and run three days of measles vaccinations. In the planning phase our job was to try and figure out which vaccination teams would go to which villages at which times, how long they’d stay in each place, and how long it would take to get to the next one. This was all decided with the advice and help of the local chief in each location, as well as other important people like school principals, health centre staff, church pastors, and parents.

At the same time, I made simple maps using my GPS device, as the Google Earth and United Nations maps (which are almost identical) lack all the place names and include several locality names which they’ve mapped as villages. My maps and distance charts are free if you contact me.

Map of the Dungu - Ndedu area, DR Congo

The “roads” through the jungle in this area range from a fairly smooth and wide path in some places to very, very, very bumpy and overgrown in others. Suffice it to say that, at the end of the fourth full day bouncing up and down on the back of a motorcycle in the jungle, I was a bit tired. Here are two of my motorcycle drivers crossing a slippery log bridge:

Motorcycles crossing a log bridge in the jungle outside Ndedu

Map of our second day based out of Ndedu:

Map of the Dungu - Ndedu area, including Kpekpere area, DR Congo

On the second day we visited villages in the area around Kpekpere, and went as far as Bawaku. One motorcycle also got a flat tire, which was soon repaired.

Inflating a flat motorcycle tire outside Ndedu, DR Congo

On the way back from Bawaku to Kpekpere we got caught by heavy rains and had to hide in the nearest large hut we could find. We were there about an hour, of which I spent perhaps 20 minutes sleeping.

Waiting out the rain on the Kpekpere - Bawaku road

Map of our third day based out of Ndedu:

Map of the Ndedu - Libombi road, DR Congo

On the third day we went all the way to Libombi, a three and a half hour drive, meaning seven hours of motorcycle movement that day, plus all the time we had to spend in each place along the way! This was by far the longest and hardest day, but it was still really fun.

On the fourth day I supervised three vaccination teams. Children waiting to be vaccinated in Li-Lungbu:

Children waiting to be vaccinated in Li-Lungbu, DR Congo

Inside a vaccination site in Kpekpere:

Inside a vaccination site in Kpekpere, DR Congo

Children waiting to be vaccinated in Kpekpere:

Children waiting to be vaccinated in Kpekpere, DR Congo

Motorcycling through the jungle south of Dungu:

Motorcycling through the jungle south of Dungu, DR Congo

Soon, we were back in Dungu for a much-needed day off work, followed by similar activities in the other direction: north! More on that later…

Disclaimer: The postings and views expressed on this site are mine alone, and do not represent the position or values of Médecins Sans Frontières.

Faradje, Province Orientale, DR Congo

On January 12th, five of us flew to Faradje, in northeastern Democratic Republic of Congo, to set up and run an emergency measles vaccination campaign for the town. We spent a pleasant, if at times very tiring, two weeks in Faradje. We ate and slept at the Catholic parish, and set ourselves up to work in the office of the Danish Refugee Council, the staff of which were exceedingly kind and welcoming. In Faradje, like many towns in DR Congo, the remnants of the violent Belgian colonial past are still very visible in the perfectly straight, tree-lined streets and a number of old buildings in various states of disrepair.

One of the three main roads in town, the Faradje-Watsa road:

Faradje - Watsa road

L’Administrateur du Territoire de Faradje has his office in an old Belgian administrative building, a facsimile of those in which many of his counterparts in other territories can be found working:

Office of the Administrateur du Territoire, Faradje

Homes in the area are newer than the colonial buildings, but the architectural style is far older, as it’s more closely matched with local needs and locally available and affordable resources for home-building.

Typical homes in Faradje

The last time I worked in DR Congo, I saw Canadian shirts all over the place, including a UBC Thunderbirds jersey in Lubutu. This time around, in a completely different part of the country and nearly two years later, it is apparently still trendy to sport Canadiana. Take, for instance, this dapper young man sporting a vintage 1993 Vancouver Canucks hockey jersey while riding his retro-style single speed bicycle around Faradje (those with a good visual memory will recall that the little crest on the corner of the jersey was worn to mark the 100-year anniversary of Lord Stanley’s Cup in 1993).

1993 Vancouver Canucks hockey jersey in Faradje

The Catholic church in Faradje, as seen from our veranda, including the police ghost, frequently seen in the area, patrolling the grounds of the church:

Catholic church in Faradje

We also went inside the church to have a quick look:

Catholic church in Faradje
Catholic church in Faradje

As for the measles vaccination campaign, which was the whole point of our visit to Faradje, we first had to set everything up. This included setting up a small generator outside the hospital to power the fridges and freezers we brought for the vaccines and ice packs. Apparently the incredibly loud noise of a generator two metres away does not in any way diminish one’s quality of sleep, evidence of which is provided by this friendly sleeping pig:

Generator setup

When I got close for a better photo, I woke him up, but the generator was no problem…

Pig in Faradje

Freezers on the left for ice packs, fridges on the right for vaccines and solvent, all correctly placed on palettes:

Cold chain setup in Faradje

Inserting frozen ice packs as an insulating layer in an ice-lined vaccine refrigerator, a step often ignored by those setting up such refrigerators:

Inserting ice packs in an ice-lined vaccine refrigerator

With the cold chain in place, and a team of community mobilisers out on the town spreading the message about the upcoming vaccination campaign, it was time to select locations for vaccination sites and get them set up. In four of the five fixed sites we set up, we built temporary shelters against the sun and rain. First, sticks were cut and holes were dug:

Digging post holes for a vaccination site, Faradje

Next, posts were pounded into the holes, cross-beams were tied to the taller posts, and orange plastic fencing was installed to control the flow of people through the vaccination sites:

Installing fencing at a vaccination site, Faradje

Completed vaccination site, minus the roof, with space for two separate vaccination teams to work:

Vaccination site without roof, Faradje

Here’s a vaccination site with tarpaulin roof attached. Children enter to either the right or left of the central dividing fence, generally based on their age (under five years on the left, five and above on the right, for instance). A child first sees a registrar who fills out a vaccination card for the child, then the child is vaccinated and receives a Vitamin A pill and sometimes a de-worming pill.

Vaccination site with roof, Faradje

The long line of people waiting four abreast was quite impressive to see on the first morning of vaccination at this vaccination site:

Long queue at a vaccination site, Faradje

Of course, every single kid who was vaccinated was a happy, smiling bundle of joy:

Child being vaccinated against measles, Faradje

After being vaccinated, each child’s finger was marked with gentian violet to show that he or she had been vaccinated:

Marking a finger as proof of vaccination

Staff for the vaccination sites, recruited locally, were identified by MSF tape around their arms. This was our youngest employee:

Youngest vaccination employee

My motorcycle driver and I were responsible for buying donuts and peanuts for the ten vaccination teams in five different sites. Each day we would buy out the entire stock of several donut sellers, who would laugh uncontrollably at the mundele (white man) with the enormous appetite for donuts.

Buying donuts for vaccination teams

As we had no vehicles in Faradje, we used the hospital ambulance for some needs, but the majority of work was done by a bunch of motorcycles we rented locally. At one point, we had over 20 motorcycles at our disposal. On the final day, we took a group photo with 16 of them:

16 of the more than 20 motorcycles used for the Faradje measles vaccination campaign

As a side project, during and after the vaccination campaign I organised to increase the size of the hospital’s healthcare waste management area, with two new pits dug: one for glass vials and ampoules, the other for the ashes of sharps boxes. We left just before the project was completed, so I had to hand over to another NGO, but we got a good start on it. Each pit was 2m long x 1m wide x 4m deep once completed:

Digging a hole for the Faradje General Hospital waste management zone

We also gave protective clothing for the man responsible for healthcare waste disposal:

Protective clothing, boots, gloves, and goggles for healthcare waste disposal

Each pit needed a reinforced cement slab as a cover. For the glass vials and ampoules pit, the slab would have a simple hole to drop the glass down into the pit, with a lid to keep rain out. For the other pit, a drum burner would be fixed in the cement so that the ashes from sharps boxes would drop directly down through a hole in the bottom of the burner, into the pit. For the cement, we had to buy gravel and sand…

Sand for concrete slab

…plus bricks for the foundation on which the slab would sit…

Bricks for concrete slab foundation

…and of course cement too! We also bought iron re-bar to reinforce the cement, and wooden planks to create the form for pouring the cement.

Cement for concrete slab

Aside from work, there were some lighter moments in Faradje, such as the First Annual Faradje Olive Pit Spitting Competition. This involved eating an olive, but keeping the pit in one’s mouth, then attempting to spit the pit into the hollow tree stump a few metres away (which can be seen in the bottom right corner of the church photo above). For the first round, each participant agreed to put $20 in the pot, and whoever first succeeded at landing the olive pit in the tree stump would get all the money in the pot. I managed it on my second try, immediately winning $40. We then decreased the buy-in to $1 for each participant, increased the number of players to eight, and kept trying for a while longer.

Olive pit spitting competition

Playing around with unused medical equipment (normally, this apparatus is used to transport people from one part of a hospital to another, or particularly in care homes, when a wheelchair or gurney is inappropriate or less convenient. In a hospital where each ward is in a building of its own, separated from the others by very uneven terrain, this patient transportation apparatus becomes more useful as a coat rack than anything else).

Playing with unused medical equipment

A bit of Monday afternoon poker with unused vaccination cards substituting for poker chips:

Poker to pass the time

We also zipped out to the river’s edge one day in Faradje to see some hippos. There were about ten of them, very cool to see! In this photo, three hippos are visible:

Three of the ten or so hippos we saw in Dungu River, Faradje

Disclaimer: The postings and views expressed on this site are mine alone, and do not represent the position or values of Médecins Sans Frontières.

How-To: The Poor Man’s Motorcycle Footpeg

My 1979 Honda CM400T

Have you ever had one of your motorcycle footpegs mysteriously disappear while your bike is parked, even though the cotter pin is still in place? Probably not. But, in case it ever happens to you too, you have two options – either buy a replacement set like this: Bikemaster Pillion Pegs For Honda

…or you could replace it yourself on the cheap without waiting for your local bike garage to order the right part from their supplier.

1. Look at one of your remaining footpegs (in my case, it was the left-side pillion peg that disappeared) to figure out the right diameter and length;

2. Find or buy a section of metal pipe that matches closely enough;

3. Cut the pipe to the correct length. If it needs to fold back against the bike, remember to cut at the same angle as the footpeg on the other side;

Cutting a pipe with an angle grinder

4. Drill a hole through both sides of the pipe, just big enough to fit the cotter pin;

5. Wrap part of an old bicycle inner tube around the pipe, and secure with some wire and electrical tape;

Poor man's footpeg with cotter pin and pliers

6. Attach to motorbike and hit the road.

Poor man's footpeg installed on 1979 Honda CM400T

Buy Bikemaster Pillion Pegs For Honda online